Red River Valley Local Nature Reserve

The entrance to Tuckingmill Country Park near Camborne
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The entrance to Tuckingmill Country Park near Camborne

 

Running  from Camborne to the sea at Gwithian the Red River LNR is a fine example of natural regeneration. As one of the most industrialised valleys during the mining period, the Red River LNR is now a partially wooded valley, with areas of heath and some beautiful lakes and ponds along the way.

Some great wildlife has been spotted on the Reserve including badgers, foxes, otters, woodpeckers and a whole array of butterflies and insects. The plants are very special too.The area is still regenerating and lots of conservation work goes on to clear areas for habitat improvements and to create better access.

The Red River gets its name from the mining wastes that used to be washed into the river, turning it a rusty red colour. With the closure of the mines this has almost stopped but you can still see the orange ochre on the river bed, a legacy of the mining era.Tin streaming was still being carried out here in the 1960s.

Bell Lake is a beautiful area of lake and wetland which used to be a millpond feeding a water wheel which would have poweed the equipment used for tin streaming.

There are several habitats along the length of the Red River:

The red river reaches the sea at Godrevy
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The red river reaches the sea at Godrevy

Gwithian Dune
Grassland and marsh attracting many birds including waders, linnets and finches. Butterflies are attracted to the great variety of wild flowers that grow here including Pyramid Orchids.

Reskajeage to Menadarva
A heathland habitat featuring gorse and heather. Look out for Angelena Labyrinthica Spider which uses the Gorse to build its funnel shaped web and the footprints of badgers.

Menadarva to Coombe
Alder and Willow Woods shelter many birds and small mammals such as shrews and mice.Bell Lake, which used to be a millpond feeding a water wheel that powered tin streaming equipment,is home to many frogs, toads and mini beasts.

Goonzoyle to Roscroggan
Dragonflies love this stretch of the river. Wetlands have been made here to help clean the mining water – now home to many birds such as the Grey Wagtail and Yellowhammer.

Roscroggan to Tolvaddon
Look out for Waterfowl such as the Moorhen and listen for the screech of noisy water shrews!